Remote Support for Students with Dyslexia

We’ve previously discussed the challenges of reading for students who have dyslexia (links to all blog posts here), but our extended experience of remote learning during the coronavirus pandemic has led these students to face a new host of difficulties in education in general and reading in particular. Some students discovered their support services, including … Continue reading “Remote Support for Students with Dyslexia”


The Importance of Certified Reading Specialists

No matter whether they learn to read at home or in the classroom, children who excel early in reading do better in school overall than those who struggle with basic literacy. Perhaps it’s because once students transition from learning to read to reading to learn, those who have a good grasp of the mechanics can … Continue reading “The Importance of Certified Reading Specialists”


Excused Absences for Mental Health

It used to be that excused absences for missing school focused solely on the visible: a broken bone, a severe illness, the death of a family member. But even before the pandemic started throwing up warning signs about students’ poor mental health, governments and school districts alike were making time for mental health days, citing … Continue reading “Excused Absences for Mental Health”


eLearning and Knowledge Acquisition

eLearning, while once a limited force in education, has moved into the mainstream, and is poised to become a leading part the future, in large part because of the necessity of remote instruction during the pandemic. Students are also becoming more immersed in the online environment outside of the classroom, with increasing social media outlets, … Continue reading “eLearning and Knowledge Acquisition”


Lessons Learned from Pandemic Instruction

We’ve learned a lot about education during the past year, with teachers and students both needing to adapt to remote platforms and distanced learning strategies. We may have discovered all these things eventually, but teaching in the time of a pandemic has pushed them front and center now. From socialization to learning loss, the lessons … Continue reading “Lessons Learned from Pandemic Instruction”


Will Continued Remote Learning Create a Separate and Unequal School System?

As vaccines become more available and the coronavirus pandemic comes more under control, many school systems are offering in-person instruction for the first time in over a year. Many others, though, are either remaining with an all-remote option or a hybrid version, with some students sitting in classrooms and others logging in from their homes. … Continue reading “Will Continued Remote Learning Create a Separate and Unequal School System?”


The Need to Improve Teaching Online Post-Pandemic

Given the speed with which teachers, some of whom had spent decades in front of a physical classroom, had to transition to all-remote learning with the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s amazing that they — and their students — have done as well as they did. Now, 14 months later, as we move back … Continue reading “The Need to Improve Teaching Online Post-Pandemic”


Teaching Reading in a Digital Age

Reading has changed dramatically over the past decade or so, with the inclusion of mobile devices like tablets and smartphones, eBooks, multimedia websites, and social media. The big questions are, though, has the way we teach reading changed with their introduction, and what should teachers be doing to help prepare students for the complexity of modern … Continue reading “Teaching Reading in a Digital Age”


Learning when to Change Your Mind and when Not To

All knowledge builds upon knowledge that came before, and new knowledge often requires a change of thought. For example, the status of a scientific theory must change and grow when new data become available from additional tests of that theory. In her article “Learning Means Changing Your Mind,” Katherine Burd argues that, in the classroom, … Continue reading “Learning when to Change Your Mind and when Not To”