Authors, Developing Words – Chris Ward, Part 1

[Editor’s note: This post is part of a continuing series on how writers craft words to express their ideas and to connect with readers. The interview was conducted by Miriam Ruff on June 27, 2019, and it is divided into two parts. It has been lightly edited for length and clarity.] MR: Welcome to the … Continue reading “Authors, Developing Words – Chris Ward, Part 1”


Authors, Developing Words – Stephen King

[Editor’s note: This post is part of a continuing series on how writers craft words to express their ideas and to connect with readers.] “Books are the perfect entertainment: no commercials, no batteries, hours of enjoyment for each dollar spent. What I wonder is why everybody doesn’t carry a book around for those inevitable dead … Continue reading “Authors, Developing Words – Stephen King”


Charting Progress in AceReader

Now that the new school year is almost upon us, teachers planning their lessons may wonder how AceReader’s Assessment Tests can help them determine how much their students will improve their reading fluency skills over the course of the next academic semester or year, as well as how they will be able to demonstrate the … Continue reading “Charting Progress in AceReader”


Authors, Developing Words – Rhett Bruno, Part 1

[Editor’s note: This post is part of a continuing series on how writers craft words to express their ideas and to connect with readers. The interview with Mr. Bruno was conducted by Miriam Ruff on June 6, 2019, and is divided in two parts. It has been lightly edited for length and clarity.] MR: Welcome to … Continue reading “Authors, Developing Words – Rhett Bruno, Part 1”


The History of Writing and Reading – Wrap-up

For the past 28 posts, we have discussed the rise of writing – and therefore reading – around the world, looking at the major developments and forces that shaped the written languages we use today. We hope that you have enjoyed the series, and we are very interested in hearing your thoughts about the information … Continue reading “The History of Writing and Reading – Wrap-up”


The History of Writing and Reading – Part 27: The Future of Writing (part 2 of 2)

[Editor’s note: This is the twenty-eighth of an ongoing series that examines the rise of writing – and therefore reading – around the world. We will be looking at the major developments and forces that shaped the written languages we use today. Links to all the previous posts are listed at the end of this … Continue reading “The History of Writing and Reading – Part 27: The Future of Writing (part 2 of 2)”


The History of Writing and Reading – Part 26: The Future of Writing (Part 1 of 2)

[Editor’s note: This is the twenty-seventh of an ongoing series that examines the rise of writing – and therefore reading – around the world. We will be looking at the major developments and forces that shaped the written languages we use today. Links to all the previous posts are listed at the end of this … Continue reading “The History of Writing and Reading – Part 26: The Future of Writing (Part 1 of 2)”


The History of Writing and Reading – Part 25: Featural Scripts (part 3 of 3)

[Editor’s note: This is the twenty-sixth of an ongoing series that examines the rise of writing – and therefore reading – around the world. We will be looking at the major developments and forces that shaped the written languages we use today. Links to all the previous posts are listed at the end of this … Continue reading “The History of Writing and Reading – Part 25: Featural Scripts (part 3 of 3)”


The History of Writing and Reading – Part 24: Featural Scripts (part 2 of 3)

[Editor’s note: This is the twenty-fifth of an ongoing series that examines the rise of writing – and therefore reading – around the world. We will be looking at the major developments and forces that shaped the written languages we use today. Links to all the previous posts are listed at the end of this … Continue reading “The History of Writing and Reading – Part 24: Featural Scripts (part 2 of 3)”

The sound of Esperanto

Zamenhof’s initial work on Esperanto, the “Unua Libro,” or “First Book,” was published in 1887. It contained 920 roots from which tens of thousands of words could be formed, along with the Fundamental Grammar, or “Fundamenta Gramatiko,” which listed 16 basic grammatical rules. Zamenhof renounced all rights to Esperanto and encouraged comments and suggestions on the development of the language. In 1905, the first Universal Esperanto Congress (La Unua Universala Esperanto Kongreso) was held at Boulogne-sur-Mer. Six hundred eighty-eight people showed up to discuss their new language in their new language, and at least one convention has been held every year since then, with the exception of the cumulative 10 years of the two World Wars. Conventions remain the major feature of the Esperanto speakers’ social calendar. [3]

Today Esperanto is the most widely used international auxiliary language and is particularly popular in Eastern Europe, China, and Brazil. There are approximately 1,000 native speakers, while 10,000 people can speak it fluently, 100,000 can use it actively, and about 10 million have studied it to some extent. Esperanto literature includes books, magazines, and poetry, with some originally written in Esperanto while others were translated into Esperanto from other languages. Some radio stations broadcast Esperanto news bulletins, and there have been at least four full-length feature films in the language, including the 1966 horror flick “Incubus” starring William Shatner. While definitely an active language, it never caught on to the extent that Zamenhof hoped.

What does Esperanto as a written language look like? Here’s one example:

Ĉiuj homoj naskiĝas liberaj kaj egalaj en digno kaj rajtoj. Ili posedas racion kaj konsciencon, kaj devus konduti unu la alian en spirito en frateco.

Translation

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

(Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)

Next up: Featural Scripts, Part 2

 

Citations:

[1] Zender, Marc. (2013). “Writing and Civilization: From Ancient Worlds to Modernity.” The Great Courses Lecture DT2241.

[2] Dean, Sam. (May 29, 2015). How an artificial language from 1887 is finding new life online. Theverge.com. Retrieved from https://www.theverge.com/2015/5/29/8672371/learn-esperanto-language-duolingo-app-origin-history

[3] Ager, Simon. (2018). “Esperanto.” Omniglot.com. Retrieved from https://www.omniglot.com/writing/esperanto.htm

 

 

To read Part 1 (Sumerians), click here.

To read Part 2 (Egyptian hieroglyphs), click here.

To read Part 3A (Indo-European languages part 1), click here.

To read Part 3B (Indo-European languages part 2), click here.

To read Part 4 (Rosetta Stone), click here.

To read Part 5 (Chinese writing), click here.

To read Part 6 (Japanese writing), click here.

To read Part 7 (Olmecs), click here.

To read Part 8 (Mayans), click here.

To read Part 9 (Aztecs/Nahuatl), click here.

To read Part 10 (Etruscans), click here.

To read Part 11 (Meroïtic), click here.

To read Part 12 (Runes and Futhark), click here.

To read Part 13 (Musical Notation), click here.

To read Part 14 (Printing, Part 1), click here.

To read Part 15 (Printing, Part 2), click here.

To read Part 16 (Printing, Part 3), click here.

To read Part 17 (Origins of English, Part 1), click here.

To read Part 18 (Origins of English, Part 2), click here.

To read Part 19 (Origins of English part 3), click here.

To read Part 20 (Origins of English, Part 4), click here.

To read Part 21 (Printing and the Digital Age), click here.

To read Part 22 (Music’s Later Developments), click here.

To read Part 23 (Featural Scripts, Part 1), click here.

 

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The History of Writing and Reading – Part 23: Featural Scripts (part 1 of 3)

[Editor’s note: This is the twenty-fourth of an ongoing series that examines the rise of writing – and therefore reading – around the world. We will be looking at the major developments and forces that shaped the written languages we use today. Links to all the previous posts are listed at the end of this … Continue reading “The History of Writing and Reading – Part 23: Featural Scripts (part 1 of 3)”