How Journalists Can Strengthen Teacher-Oriented Reporting

There’s no question that journalists can influence public perception by what they report and how they report it. Public Agenda, a democracy-focused research and action organization wanted to understand how journalists have portrayed teachers over the years and if those portrayals have changed. To accomplish this, they analyzed a random sample of over 2,300 news … Continue reading “How Journalists Can Strengthen Teacher-Oriented Reporting”


The Role of School Psychologists in the Educational Process: Part 1

[Editor’s note: This is the first part of a three-part interview conducted by Miriam Ruff with Dr. Kim Hastings, a nationally certified school psychologist. It has been lightly edited for length and clarity.] MR: In general terms, what is a school psychologist? What role do they play in the school setting? KH: From the National … Continue reading “The Role of School Psychologists in the Educational Process: Part 1”


Technology Trends in the Classroom

Common Sense Education released their report “The common sense census: Inside the 21st-century classroom” in 2019. Their results were based on a survey of 1,200 US K-12 teachers to explore “what it takes to support teachers and prepare students as schools navigate the growing presence of technology.” The completed report breaks down how teachers, primarily … Continue reading “Technology Trends in the Classroom”


Savvy Strategies for Integrating Technology into the Classroom

In a past blog post, we described the efforts of teachers trying to integrate technology and technological tools into their classrooms. Then came the pandemic, with an abrupt shift to distance learning that, by definition, was technology-dependent and a game-changing experience. Now our knowledge of educational technology has skyrocketed, along with a host of strategies we … Continue reading “Savvy Strategies for Integrating Technology into the Classroom”


Learning when to Change Your Mind and when Not To

All knowledge builds upon knowledge that came before, and new knowledge often requires a change of thought. For example, the status of a scientific theory must change and grow when new data become available from additional tests of that theory. In her article “Learning Means Changing Your Mind,” Katherine Burd argues that, in the classroom, … Continue reading “Learning when to Change Your Mind and when Not To”


Max Lang – Comic Book Sorting Specialist, Parent, and Avid Reader

[Editor’s note: This interview was conducted by Miriam Ruff, and it is the fourth installment in what will be a series of interviews about the different approaches people take to discover and learn new topics. It was lightly edited for clarity.] MR: Welcome to AceReader; we’re glad to have you here. ML: Thanks! MR: Let’s … Continue reading “Max Lang – Comic Book Sorting Specialist, Parent, and Avid Reader”


Poverty and the Educational Process – Part 3: Vocabulary and Cognition

[Editor’s note: This is part three of a four-part series on poverty and the educational process. Links to the previous blog posts are included below.] Poverty has a multifaceted impact on both student engagement and student success in the classroom. Last time we looked at Effort and the Growth Mindset. In this post, we are … Continue reading “Poverty and the Educational Process – Part 3: Vocabulary and Cognition”


Poverty and the Educational Process – Part 1: Health and Nutrition

[Editor’s note: This is part one of a four-part series on poverty and the educational process. Links to the previous blog posts will be included in each succeeding part.] In 2015, approximately about 20 percent of children under the age of 18 (about 14.7 million) came from families living in poverty, and 10 percent lived … Continue reading “Poverty and the Educational Process – Part 1: Health and Nutrition”


Physical Exercise and Learning

When you want to make your body fit, you exercise. When you want to make your brain sharper, you also exercise? And we’re not talking about crossword puzzles or mind games here, but actual, physical aerobic exercise. Why should that be? Let’s take a look at what we know so far about the correlation between … Continue reading “Physical Exercise and Learning”