Interview with Fiona Quinn – Reader, Writer, and Homeschool Mom (Part 2)

[Editor’s note: This interview was conducted by Miriam Ruff to trace one person’s path as a reader; to demonstrate the relationship between writing and reading; and to convey the experiences of a homeschool mom teaching her children the love of reading. It has been edited slightly for length, fluency, and clarity. To read Part 1, … Continue reading “Interview with Fiona Quinn – Reader, Writer, and Homeschool Mom (Part 2)”


Visual Stress Relief

Visual stress is something most people can relate to. We’re so busy looking at our computers, tablets, and smartphones every day that we overtax our eyes to the point where simply reading can be difficult. When we were hunters, gatherers, and farmers, we used our long-distance vision more. Today, though, we mostly use our eyes … Continue reading “Visual Stress Relief”


What is Reading Comprehension, and How Do We Assess It?

Reading comprehension is a hard concept to define, and an even harder one to assess. Though when asked, most people will say something on the order of “It means what you understand,” that’s really just substituting one undefined word for another. How can we get to the heart of the matter? According to Webster’s Collegiate … Continue reading “What is Reading Comprehension, and How Do We Assess It?”


The Value of Reading to Kids at an Early Age

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents begin reading to their children as soon as they are born. While this may seem a little early to some, there is an increasing body of evidence that shows that kids who have early and regular exposure to books and stories – sometimes called “bookishness” – have … Continue reading “The Value of Reading to Kids at an Early Age”


Illiteracy in America – Part 1

Functional illiteracy is defined by the non-profit Literacy Volunteers of America as “the inability of an individual to use reading, writing, and computational skills in everyday life.” Think that’s not a problem in as developed a country as America? Well, you’re wrong. It’s a big one – a really big one. The National Center for … Continue reading “Illiteracy in America – Part 1”


Ways to Help Struggling Readers

Most of the fundamental reading skills are taught to students between grades 1 and 3. It is essential that the students grasp the concepts and develop strong skills at that time, as beyond grade 3, students don’t learn to read but, instead, read to learn. For students who struggle with reading, teachers find that they … Continue reading “Ways to Help Struggling Readers”


Understanding Dyslexia – Part 2

[Editor’s note: This is Part 2 of a four-part series on dyslexia. Links to the other parts are included in the blog.] In Part 1 of our discussion on dyslexia, we talked a little bit about the disorder and the difficulties dyslexics encounter when reading, spelling, and even verbalizing. Now we’re going to look at … Continue reading “Understanding Dyslexia – Part 2”


Guest Blog: Robert Burnett, Individual User, on the AceReader Program

[Editor’s note: This is the second in an occasional series of guest blogs from a variety of AceReader users.] My reading efforts over the years have been an up and down journey. By the time I was four, I was already reading storybooks, and as a young kid I was a frequent, engaged reader. The … Continue reading “Guest Blog: Robert Burnett, Individual User, on the AceReader Program”


Reading Formats – Should You Use Print or Electronic Material?

Paper or plastic? It’s a question we get asked a lot these days, but not only at the grocery store. As we move further into the digital age, there is a growing debate about the effectiveness of reading a book in a traditional, paper-based format versus reading it in on an eReader or other screen-based … Continue reading “Reading Formats – Should You Use Print or Electronic Material?”


Teaching to the Test

A hot topic in education today is whether or not teachers should “teach to the test” or if that practice limits students’ education too severely. There are opinions on both sides of the fence, and it’s a subject worth exploring because of its vast repercussions on the skills of the next generation, who will allow … Continue reading “Teaching to the Test”