Using Games for Comprehension

Generally when we get individual students, or schools, onto the AceReader platform, we stress that improving your reading skills is not a competition. The only person you’re competing against is yourself, and the only scores that matter are those that show how much your speed, comprehension, and fluency improve as a result of your practice … Continue reading “Using Games for Comprehension”


Guest Blog: Kidus Yared, 10th-Grade Student, on the AceReader Program

[Editor’s note: This is the fourth in an occasional series of guest blogs from a variety of AceReader users.] I’m currently in the 10th grade at Richard Montgomery High School, and I’ve been using the AceReader program on-and-off since I was about eight or nine years old. Reading has been a part of my life … Continue reading “Guest Blog: Kidus Yared, 10th-Grade Student, on the AceReader Program”


Assessing Comprehension in the Real World

Our world has transitioned from a pen-and-paper to a multimedia experience. Instead of getting our information strictly from encyclopedias and books catalogued on note cards in the public library, we now look to the internet, social media, texts, videos, and online courses for content. What this means for reading is that we do not just … Continue reading “Assessing Comprehension in the Real World”


Guest Blog: Miriam Ruff, Reading Instructor and Content Developer, on the AceReader Program

[Editor’s note: This is the third in an occasional series of guest blogs from a variety of AceReader users.] I have always been an avid reader. Since the time I was three or four, I had a book in my hands, and I was reading by the time I was in kindergarten. During my elementary, … Continue reading “Guest Blog: Miriam Ruff, Reading Instructor and Content Developer, on the AceReader Program”


Guest Blog: Robert Burnett, Individual User, on the AceReader Program

[Editor’s note: This is the second in an occasional series of guest blogs from a variety of AceReader users.] My reading efforts over the years have been an up and down journey. By the time I was four, I was already reading storybooks, and as a young kid I was a frequent, engaged reader. The … Continue reading “Guest Blog: Robert Burnett, Individual User, on the AceReader Program”


Reading Formats – Should You Use Print or Electronic Material?

Paper or plastic? It’s a question we get asked a lot these days, but not only at the grocery store. As we move further into the digital age, there is a growing debate about the effectiveness of reading a book in a traditional, paper-based format versus reading it in on an eReader or other screen-based … Continue reading “Reading Formats – Should You Use Print or Electronic Material?”


The Need for Reading

In our social media-obsessed world, there seems to be less and less time for reading books. Gone are the days when kids would plead with their parents at bedtime for “just one more story,” and when they would hide out under the covers with a flashlight and a book, hoping not to get caught reading … Continue reading “The Need for Reading”


Targeting the Young to Promote Adult Literacy

As part of the Development Lexicon Project study, scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin are currently studying how words are read by people ranging from first-graders to seventy-year-olds. The researchers are focusing on three different characteristics of a word: its length, its frequency of use within the language, and its … Continue reading “Targeting the Young to Promote Adult Literacy”


Visualization and its Role in Reading

Visualization is a large part of the learning process. We picture how a word looks or mentally “see” how a character looks as he is described by the author. But what if you weren’t able to visualize? Some people can’t. The condition is called “aphantasia,” and we’re only beginning to understand how this affects the … Continue reading “Visualization and its Role in Reading”